POLI09003 2017 Social Policy for Social Work

General Details

Full Title
Social Policy for Social Work
Transcript Title
Soc Pol
Code
POLI09003
Attendance
100 %
Subject Area
POLI - Policy Studies
Department
SOCS - Social Sciences
Level
09 - NFQ Level 9
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2017 - Full Academic Year 2017-18
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
John Pender
Programme Membership
SG_WSOWO_M09 201800 Master of Arts in Social Work
Description

This module provides students of social work with a thorough exploration and detailed interrogation of the emergence and evolution of the Welfare State and attendant social policies, social policy-making and social policy analysis in Ireland. The impact of political and economic preferences, ideology, values and principles underpinning the foundations of Irish social policy are reviewed and critiqued.

It undertakes these objectives by re-acquainting participants with concepts such as Welfare State, social justice, rights and capabilities approaches, social citizenship and new social risks. These concepts are unpacked and critically reviewed by way of customized case studies that address topical social policy issues and concerns such as poverty, homelessness, disability, ageing, ethnicity, health and wellbeing, children’s rights, youth policy, social protection policies, the wider social benefits system and relevant agencies of welfare delivering these.

Participants are encouraged and equipped to utilize problem-based learning tools and critical policy analysis instruments throughout their engagement with the module. Possible lesson learning, best international practices and evidence-based approaches around the identification of need and delivery of target services and policies is undertaken by way of comparator reviews of approaches to social policy development among EU member states and further afield.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Account for, interpret, challenge and anticipate the dominant social, economic, political and cultural moulding forces shaping social policy formulation and welfare and wellbeing enhancing policies.

2.

Evidence an advanced understanding of social justice perspectives including rights-based and capabilities approaches to social policy needs identification and service delivery.

3.

Determine and implement the most appropriate, cost-effective and wellbeing maximising social policy instruments and interventionist policies addressing the myriad needs of at risk and vulnerable groups in Ireland.

4.

Systematically survey and critically appraise agencies of welfare administering, managing and delivering social goods and services.

5.

Critically distinguish between and appropriately identify and apply different models and approaches to social policy-making and policy analysis.

6.

Situate, contextualise and critically evaluate Irish social policy comparatively.

Teaching and Learning Strategies

Module participants will be expected to attend online and face-to-face (intensive on-campus residencies) teaching and learning sessions. Weekly online content, accessible by way of Adobe Connect and/or Panopto, will ensure the dissemination of syllabus content. These sessions will involve a mix of synchronous and asynchronous delivery. Augmenting these virtual delivery modes, participants will be expected to attend a two-day intensive residency twice per semester. Participants will be facilitated to engage in problem-based learning pedagogies and will co-produce a range of creative and sustainable policy solutions to a number of staff generated case studies and simulation exercises.

Module Assessment Strategies

Participants are expected to successfully complete the following:

(1) Production of a group (maximum of Two participants) generated feasibility screencast presentation ‑ broadcast to all module participants via Adobe Connect/Panopto ‑ [Maximum 10 minutes duration] on tutor(s) agreed policy simulation topic that incorporates significant elements of LO2 and LO3 from Professional Ethics and Social Work Practice (ETHC09002) (30%);

(2) Attendance at and active participation in a 1-2 hour policy simulation event [60%];

(3) Individual reflection write-up (Maximum 1000 words) [10%].

Repeat Assessments

Successful completion of an essay [2000 words] (100%).

Module Dependencies

Co-requisites
ETHC09002 201700 Professional Ethics in Social Work Practice

Indicative Syllabus

LO1 (Account for, interpret, challenge and anticipate the dominant social, economic, political and cultural moulding forces shaping social policy formulation and welfare and wellbeing enhancing policies):

The origins and function of the 'Welfare State': positioning Ireland internationally;

LO1 (Account for, interpret, challenge and anticipate the dominant social, economic, political and cultural moulding forces shaping social policy formulation and welfare and wellbeing enhancing policies):

Political and ideological moulding forces shaping welfare and social policy development and the role of principles, norms and societal values on social policy formulation; Political parties and social welfare objectives and preferences; macro economic issues including financial crises, globalisation, financialisation, futures of welfare and social policy (roboticisation, Artificial Intelligence (AI), re-design of social protection system e.g. univeral basis income etc.);

LO1 (Account for, interpret, challenge and anticipate the dominant social, economic, political and cultural moulding forces shaping social policy formulation and welfare and wellbeing enhancing policies):

What do we mean by 'public and social policy'?;

LO1 (Account for, interpret, challenge and anticipate the dominant social, economic, political and cultural moulding forces shaping social policy formulation and welfare and wellbeing enhancing policies):

Evidence-based practice and social policy development; the role of Think Tanks;

LO2 (Evidence an advanced understanding of social justice perspectives including rights-based and capabilities approaches to social policy needs identification and service delivery):

Unpacking concepts of social rights of citizenship, rights-based and capabilities approaches to social policy needs identification;

LO2 (Evidence an advanced understanding of social justice perspectives including rights-based and capabilities approaches to social policy needs identification and service delivery):

Policy‑making and advocacy: the media, campaigning groups and new social movements, pressure groups, epistemic communities, network theory;

LO3 (Determine and implement the most appropriate, cost-effective and wellbeing maximising social policy instruments and interventionist policies addressing the myriad needs of at risk and vulnerable groups in Ireland):

The administration, organization, planning and delivery of welfare services; cost-benefit analyses approaches to policy development and outcomes; UN Human Development Index (HDI) policy proofing;

LO4 (Systematically survey and critically appraise agencies of welfare administering, managing and delivering social goods and services):

Introduction to approaches to policy‑making and policy analysis:

Rational choice theory (e.g. Simon's bounded rationality, March and Olsen's notions of irrationality and policy‑making ‑ 'Garbage Can Model', Weber and bureaucracy, Lindholm and incrementalism, Nudge Theory);

Power approaches to policy-making (elitism, pluralism, Marxism, corporatism, professionalism, technocracy);

Public Choice approaches; Institutional approaches (sociological, economic and political and 'new' institutionalism), policy‑making and analysis in complex situations;

LO5 (Critically distinguish between and appropriately identify and apply different models and approaches to social policy-making and policy analysis):

Exploring policy‑making in action including at least two of the following key social policy case studies: homelessness and housing policy, health, social inclusion and poverty, minority ethnicities, disability, children, youth policy, the benefits system, older people, inter-generational welfarism, etc.;

LO6 (Situate, contextualise and critically evaluate Irish social policy comparatively):

Ireland in comparative context: the impact of European Union membership and wider global discourses on social policy and welfare provision.

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Screencast broadcast Continuous Assessment Project 30 % Week 6 1,2
2 Policy role play simulation Continuous Assessment Oral Exam 60 % Week 12 1,2,3,4,5
3 Individual personal reflection Continuous Assessment Assignment 10 % Week 13 1,2,3,4,5,6

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Problem Based Learning Flat Classroom Intensive residency 9 Twice Per Semester 1.20
Independent Learning Not Specified Independent Learning 4.5 Weekly 4.50
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 1.20 Hours

Online Learning Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Online Lecture Distance Learning Suite Online 1.5 Weekly 1.50
Total Online Learning Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 1.50 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Alcock, P., May, M., and Wright, S. (eds) (2012): The Student's Companion to Social Policy (4th Edition). Wiley-Blackwell.

Anderson, K.M., (2015): Social Policy in the European Union. Palgrave.

Birnbaum, S., Ferrarini, T., Nelson, K., and Palme, J. (2017): The Generational Welfare Contract. Edgar Elgar.

Cairney, P. (2012): Understanding Public Policy: Theories and Issues. Palgrave MacMillan.

Coakley, J., and Gallagher, M. (eds), (2017): Politics in the Republic of Ireland. Routledge.

Dukelow, F., and Considine, M., (2017): Irish Social Policy: A Critical Introduction (2nd Edition). Policy Press.

Fitzpatrick, T., (2011): Welfare Theory: An Introduction to the Theoretical Debates in Social Policy (2nd Edition). Palgrave MacMillan.

Healy, S., Bourke, S., Leahy, A., Murphy, E., Murphy, M., and Reynolds, B. (eds) (2017): A New Social Contract for a New Century: Securing Solidarity and the Common Good. Social Justice Ireland.

Kahneman, D., (2012): Thinking, Fast and Slow. Penguin.

Moore-Cherry, N., and McHale, J., (2017): Debating austerity in Ireland: crisis, experience and recovery. Royal Irish Academy.

Murphy, M.P., and Dukelow, F., (2016): The Irish Welfare State in the Twenty-First Century: Challenges and Change. Palgrave MacMillan.

Nussbaum, M., (2011): Creating Capabilities. Harvard University Press.

Nutley, S. M., Walter, I., and Davies, H.T.O., (2007): Using Evidence: How research can inform public services. Policy Press.

Parson, W., (1996): Public Policy: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Policy Analysis. Edgar Elgar.

Pickett, K., and Wilkinson, R., (2010): The Spirit Level: Why Equality is Better for Everyone. Penguin.

Room, G, (2010): Complexity, Institutions and Public Policy: Agile Decision-Making in A Turbulent World. Edward Elgar.

Sunstein, C. R., and Thaler, R. H., (2009): Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness. Penguin.

Taylor-Gooby, P., Chung, H., and Leruth, B. (eds), (2017): After Austerity: Welfare State Transformation in Europe after the Great Recession. Oxford University Press.

Taylor-Gooby, P., (2013): The Double Crisis of the Welfare State and What We Can Do about It. Palgrave Pivot.

van Oorschot, W., Meuleman, B., and Reeskens, T. (eds), (2017): The Social Legitimacy of Targeted Welfare Attitudes to Welfare Deservingness. Edgar Elgar.