ENVR09023 2016 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES 3 WASTE AND ENERGY

General Details

Full Title
ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES 3 WASTE AND ENERGY
Transcript Title
ENV. SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES 3
Code
ENVR09023
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
ENVR - Environmental Science
Department
ESCI - Environmental Science
Level
09 - NFQ Level 9
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2016 - Full Academic Year 2016-17
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Declan Feeney, Edel Costello, Steve Tonry, Ann-Marie Duddy
Programme Membership
SG_SEHSM_M09 201600 Master of Science in EHS Management
Description

This Module explores salient energy and waste management issues in Ireland.  It investigates the options available to deal with waste and energy use within the current policy and legislative framework.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.
Demonstrate an understanding of the basis of current EU and national waste/energy policy and legislation and discuss implications for various stakeholders.
2.

Scrutinise the importance of  the waste management hierarchy in achieving maximum resource efficiencies and promoting waste management options that do not adversely affect the environment

3.

Communicate the essential elements of an efficient monitoring plan to ensure that selected waste/energy management options do not impact on the environment

4.

Evaluate the main environmental and socio-economic impacts of current and proposed future national waste and energy management strategies

5.

Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major obligations/provisions of the main current Irish legislation that relates to waste/energy management

6.

Demonstrate an understanding of the units of energy demand and use.

7.

Prepare evidence-based proposals as to why and how energy  management initiatives may be applied in the domestic/commercial/industrial sector and discuss the potential environmental benefits of such proposals

Teaching and Learning Strategies

The students will be exposed to a blend of learning activities e.g. online lectures (via Adobe Connect or similar), independent learning and directed learning.  This approach is expected to address various student learning needs.  Moodle will be used to upload educational material e.g. powerpoint presentations, recordings of on-line lectures and supplementary reading material) and a means of assessment (e.g. quizzes, uploading assignments and journals).  The online delivery will be blended with workshops to bring the learners together to facilitate group learning.

Module Assessment Strategies

Continuous assessment 50%

Final exam: 50%

Regular assessments will be undertaken via Moodle and assignments uploaded via Moodle.

Assignments may be designed across Modules delivered within the same semester.

Students may be assessed individually or in group environments with a strong emphasis on continual improvement and skill building.

Repeat Assessments

Repeat assessment, where relevant, will involve assignment, practical test or examination that provides evidence that the student has met the subject and topic learning outcomes to the required standard.

Module Dependencies

Prerequisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Incompatibles
None

Indicative Syllabus

Waste classification

Characteristics and environmental impacts associated with waste streams generated from specified sectors

Elements of an effective waste management strategy

Roles and statutory responsibilities of various stakeholders in waste management issues (including local authorites, EPA, public sector, private sector, producers and holders of waste and waste hauliers)

Application of the waste management hierarchy/BAT

Introduction to waste prevention techniques (e.g. DfE, quality systems, green procurement, LCA

Introduction to waste management techniques including MBT, composting, anerobic digestion, incineration and landfill

Environmental monitoring associated with specified large scale waste management facilities

Producer responsibility initiatives and their role in reducing waste volumes and the environmental impacts associated with specified waste streams

Resource value of waste

Waste licence/permit applications 

Waste Management Planning

Energy/fuel mix trends

Energy policy and legislation

Energy demand in buildings

Environmental building design

Demand-side management

Renewable and Conventional energy sources

Energy efficient technologies

Energy assessment tools

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
50 %
End of Semester / Year Formal Exam
50 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Written Report Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 25 % Week 7 1,2,4,5
2 Continuous Assessment Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 25 % Week 11 6,7
             

End of Semester / Year Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Final Exam Final Exam UNKNOWN 50 % End of Term 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
             
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Flat Classroom Lecture 2.5 Weekly 2.50
Independent Learning UNKNOWN Self Study 4.5 Weekly 4.50
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 2.50 Hours

Online Learning Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Not Specified On-line lectures, tutorial, workshops 2.5 Weekly 2.50
Independent Learning Not Specified Research, writing reports, reading, studying for exams 4.5 Weekly 4.50
Total Online Learning Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 2.50 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Cheremisinoff, N.P. (2003) Handbook of Solid Waste Management and Waste Minimization.  Butterworth-Heinemann Publishers.

Porter, R.C. (2002) The Economics of Waste.  Resources for the Future.

Rhyner, C.R., Wenger, R.B. and Schwartz, L.J. (1998)  Waste Management and Resource Recovery. CRC Press.

Ristinen, R.A. and Kraushaar, J.P. (2006) ‘Energy and the Environment' 2nd edition. Wiley.

Cartledge, Brian  (1993) ‘Energy and the Environment'  Oxford University Press.

Huber, P.W. and Mills, M.P (2005) ‘The Bottomless Well- the twilight of fuel, the virtue of waste and why we will never run out of energy'  Technology and Engineering.

Richards, D.J. and Pearson, G. (1998) ‘The Ecology of Industry- Sectors and Linkages' National Academies Press. 

SEI (2006), Dwelling Energy Assessment Procedure Manual.  2006 Edition, Version 2.2.  Sustainable Energy Ireland, Dublin.

McMullan, R. (2008)), Environmental Science in Buildings.  6th edition.  Palgrave MacMillan, England.

URL Resources
Other Resources

Moodle

Additional Information

None