COMP06258 2018 Maker Lab 201

General Details

Full Title
Maker Lab 201
Transcript Title
Maker Lab 201
Code
COMP06258
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
COMP - Computing
Department
COMP - Computing & Creative Practices
Level
06 - NFQ Level 6
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Stage
Fee
Start Term
2018 - Full Academic Year 2018-19
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Drew Lang, Mr. John Kelleher
Programme Membership
SG_KAPPL_H08 201800 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Computing in Application Design and User Experience SG_KSMAR_H08 201800 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Computing in Smart Technologies SG_KNCLD_H08 201800 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Computing in Computer Networks and Cloud Infrastructure SG_KNCLD_B07 201800 Bachelor of Science in Computing in Computer Networks and Cloud Infrastructure SG_KSMAR_C06 201800 Higher Certificate in Science in Computing in Smart Technologies SG_KSMAR_B07 201800 Bachelor of Science in Computing in Smart Technologies SG_KAPPL_C06 201800 Higher Certificate in Science in Computing in Application Design and User Experience SG_KAPPL_B07 201800 Bachelor of Arts in Computing in Application Design and User Experience SG_KNETW_C06 201800 Higher Certificate in Science in Computing in Computer Networks
Description

Maker Lab 201 introduces students to the notion of a maker space. It is an environment to enable students to progress from prespective tasks to independent exploration and implementation of their own ideas. The Maker Movement is a vehicle that allows students experience constructivist education. It is a movement that allows students be creative, innovative, independent, and technologically literate; not an “alternative” way to learn, but what modern learning should really look like.

Fundamentally, it espouses the principles of:

  1. Idea Cultivation: Through collaborative and open work, new ideas are born and developed encouraging each other to invent and innovate.
  2. Rapid Prototyping: Develop quick and early experiments using ready-made components and well stocked maker environment.
  3. Strategic Iteration: Move quickly through the process to find the most feasible—and desirable—solution.

The module benefits from a diversity of student cohorts to offer complementary insights into the design and development of solutions. Emphasis will be placed on students identifying problems and exploring the design space to scope an approach to its remedy. The objective of this module is to introduce students to the ingredients of basic IoT hybrid solutions (part hardware, part software), understanding their workings (e.g. invoke a driver library) and experiment with the application of this knowledge.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Identify, employ and trouble-shoot software/hardware components appropriate to the Internet of Things

2.

Document, illustrate and present the process behind a developed/provided solution

3.

Propose, articulate and investigate a problem scenario scoping the constituent issues and actors.

4.

Demonstrate inventiveness, cooperation/engagement and exploration in the pursuit of a solution

Teaching and Learning Strategies

Opportunity will be given for students will work and be assessed both individually and collaboratively. It is likely that cohorts of students from a variety of computing programmes will work as a unit to ensure maximum opportunity to develop the transferable skills of presenting, writing, discussing, working with others, and time/skill management.

The scope of the planned exercises is such as to encourage participation across different computing programmes (e.g. UX expertise would be useful as would knowledge of networking protocols). However, formal assessments will primarily focus on individual work to ensure fairness and transparency of effort/reward.

Module Assessment Strategies

The main assessments will be a team project where students will apply design thinking to imagine an IOT solution to a real world problem. They will then produce a  prototype as a proof of concept. Students will be asked to present their solutions as well as to write a report. The emphasis is on the process; creativity, teamwork using the tools above to produce an end product.

Repeat Assessments

Students must engage with module lecturer to ensure access to necessary hardware material for completion of a repeat project. 

Indicative Syllabus

Identify, employ and trouble-shoot software/hardware components appropriate to the Internet of Things

  • Micro-controller boards
  • Role, configuration, interfacing & programmability
  • Development environment e.g. bash/vim/Particle/Github
  • Basic circuitry, sensors, shields, actuators, LEDs etc..
  • Simple programming logic to perform physical computing
  • Networking of solution componentry (including security and similar issues)

Document, illustrate and present the process behind a developed/provided solution

  • Technical and customer-focused documenting of work
  • E.g. Fritzing for circuitry, Hackaday.io for project documentation, Github for code
  • Presentation of solutions and group review

Propose, articulate and investigate a problem scenario scoping the constituent issues and actors.

  • Explore problem spaces amenable to IoT solutions
  • Scope possible alternative solutions focusing on constraints such as practicality, cost, durability, and power.


Demonstrate inventiveness, cooperation/engagement and exploration in the pursuit of a solution

  • Workshop-based, emphasis on invention, community resources, real-world application, integration of known solutions
  • E.g. weather station monitor via app, using senseHAT for RPi 

 

The module will employ standard (open-source where possible) off-the-shelf components such as Raspberry Pi, Arduino or Beaglebone/BeagleBoard though this is subject to change as the technology evolves. 

 

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Project Project Group Project 40 % Week 14 2,3,4
2 Prototype Build Project Group Project 15 % Week 5 1,4
3 Prototype Project Individual Project 45 % Week 9 2,3

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Workshop Design Workshop Project Work 4 Weekly 4.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 4.00 Hours

Required & Recommended Book List

Recommended Reading
2016-11-16 The Big Book of Makerspace Projects: Inspiring Makers to Experiment, Create, and Learn McGraw-Hill Education TAB
ISBN 1259644251 ISBN-13 9781259644252
Recommended Reading
2016-02-25 Arduino in a Nutshell: A Desktop Quick Reference O'Reilly Media
ISBN 1491921765 ISBN-13 9781491921760
Recommended Reading
2014-01-10 Raspberry Pi Cookbook O'Reilly Media
ISBN 1449365221 ISBN-13 9781449365226

The world of Raspberry Pi is evolving quickly, with many new interface boards and software libraries becoming available all the time. In this cookbook, prolific hacker and author Simon Monk provides more than 200 practical recipes for running this tiny low-cost computer with Linux, programming it with Python, and hooking up sensors, motors, and other hardwareincluding Arduino. Youll also learn basic principles to help you use new technologies with Raspberry Pi as its ecosystem develops. Python and other code examples from the book are available on GitHub. This cookbook is ideal for programmers and hobbyists familiar with the Pi through resources such as Getting Started with Raspberry Pi (OReilly).

Recommended Reading
2016-05-31 Raspberry Pi Cookbook: Software and Hardware Problems and Solutions O′Reilly
ISBN 1491939109 ISBN-13 9781491939109

Module Resources

URL Resources

www.hackaday.io

www.hackster.io

www.instructables.com

www.arduino.cc

nodered.org

www.ibm.com/cloud/  (BlueMix)