CHEM07008 2019 Spectroscopy and Atomic Spectrometry for Forensic Analysts

General Details

Full Title
Spectroscopy and Atomic Spectrometry for Forensic Analysts
Transcript Title
Spectroscopy and Atomic Spectr
Code
CHEM07008
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
CHEM - Chemistry
Department
LIFE - Life Sciences
Level
07 - NFQ Level 7
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2019 - Full Academic Year 2019-20
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Ted McGowan
Programme Membership
SG_SFORE_G07 201900 Bachelor of Science in Science in Forensic Invest & Analys(Emb) SG_SFORE_H08 201900 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Science in Forensic Science and Analysis SG_SFORE_B07 201900 Bachelor of Science in Science in Forensic Investigation and Analysis
Description

The aims of this module are to provide a theoretical and practical introduction to a range of modern instrumental analytical techniques based on spectroscopy and  atomic spectrometry and used for forensic analysis.  The course will emphasise the forensic application of these techniques, sample preparation, quality control and the interpretation of analytical data from these instruments.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Explain the fundamental features of the following spectrometric techniques: molecular ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy; atomic absorption and atomic emission spectroscopy; infrared spectroscopy.

2.

Contrast the analytical features (including applications and limitations, etc.) of the following  techniques: molecular ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy; atomic absorption spectrometry; atomic emission spectrometry; infrared spectroscopy.

3.

Prepare forensic samples for analysis and operate flame photometers, atomic absorption spectrometers, ultraviolet visible spectrophotometers and infrared spectrometers.

4.

Record data and maintain records of analytical work in a laboratory notebook in a format required by Good Laboratory Practice and ISO17025.

5.

Write experimental reports and evaluate scientific data including the reliability of analytical data using simple statistical and quality control techniques.

Teaching and Learning Strategies

This module will be delivered fulltime (or part-time for online modules). This will include lectures, problem based learning (PBL) and laboratory practicals augmented by independent learning and directed learning. This approach is expected to address student learning needs. Moodle will be used as a repository of educational resources and as a means of assessment (e.g. quizzes, uploading assignments and journals referemces). Self-assessment tests and other forms of formative assessment are provided to students to check their own progress towards achieving the learning outcomes of the module and to motivate learning.

Module Assessment Strategies

This module is 50% Continuous Assessment and 50 % Final exam.  The continuous assessment will include the following elements: formative assessment through preparation of assignments for discussion at workshops and through pre-laboratory assignments for which answers are given in advance; written assessment around mid- semester (5%);workshop assignments (5%); weekly pre-laboratory assignments(10%); assessment of practical laboratory work and of  laboratory reports (30%)

The student must reach an assigned gate (mark) in the final exam and achieve 40% overall to pass the subject.

Repeat Assessments

Repeat Continuous Assessment and/or Final Exam

Module Dependencies

Prerequisites
Analytical Chemical Techniques and Analytical Techniques  or equivalent (Theory and Practical)
Co-requisites
None
Incompatibles
None

Indicative Syllabus

1. Explain the fundamental features of the following spectrometric techniques: molecular ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy; atomic absorption and atomic emission spectroscopy; infrared spectroscopy.

 

Introduction to spectroscopy: Properties of electromagnetic radiation. Origin of vibrational, rotational, atomic and molecular energy levels and spectra. Origin of line, band and continuum spectra.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard describe the application and  theory relating to a the range of analytical techniques that are available to the forensic scientist, understand the parameters involved in method selection and be able to provide a forensic strategy and an analytical strategy for a given scenario.

 

2. Contrast the analytical features (including applications and limitations, etc.) of the following  techniques: molecular ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy; atomic absorption spectrometry; atomic emission spectrometry; infrared spectroscopy.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard it is important to demonstrate an understanding of the theory relating range of analytical procedures, specifically within the forensic context.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard demonstrate competence in operating a range of modern analytical instruments and be conversant with the use of related computer software.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard for principal laboratory equipment used in forensic science explain in reasonable detail and usually from a comparative perspective, the principles of operation, calibration (incl. controls and reference standards), specificity, sensitivity, precision and accuracy.  In addition utility, effectiveness and efficiency in terms of materials, time, and cost when applied in a forensic context. Practicals to incorporate deliberate errors to further challenge the student

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard demonstrate an aware ness of alternative and emerging technologies e.g. ICP-MS, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence 

 

Ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy: Instrumentation, qualitative and quantitative forensic analysis applications, Beer's law and interferences and deviations from Beer's law.

 Flame emission and flame atomic absorption spectrometry(FAAS): Spectral sources, flame types, sample introduction systems, detection and readout systems.

 Electrothermal vapourisation atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS): Description and optimisation of instrumentation

 Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Interpretation of infrared spectra of organic compounds. Quantitative infrared spectrometry. Infrared spectra of trace forensic materials.

 

3. Prepare forensic samples for analysis and operate flame photometers, atomic absorption spectrometers, ultraviolet visible spectrophotometers and infrared spectrometers.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard demonstrate an understanding of safe working practices (personal safety, safety of team members and others present) and the function and practice of quality assurance; validation and peer review. The basic PPE requirements and anti-contamination should be implemented including development of an awareness of appropriate risk assessment.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard it is important to develop  practical skills relating range of analytical procedures (including reinforcement of basic skills such as pipetting) , specifically within the forensic context.

 

 

Sample and standard preparation techniques infrared, uv-visible and atomic spectrometric analysis

Application of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and diffuse reflectance/integrating sphere accessories for infrared.

Preparation of forensic samples for infrared analysis (liquid samples, nujol mulls, potassium bromide disks, attenuated total reflectance) and collection of spectra

 

4. Record data and maintain records of analytical work in a laboratory notebook in a format required by Good Laboratory Practice and ISO17025.

 

The laboratory course will be integrated closely with the theory course, and the experiments will be of the type shown covering a range of common forensic spectrochemical analysis techniques.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard record observations and experimental methodology in the form of structured notes (including photography)  in a logical, comprehensive and contemporaneous manner

 

Records for the quantitative forensic analysis by ultraviolet ‑ visible spectrometry using Beer's Law

Records for the simultaneous analysis of a two component mixture by ultraviolet ‑ visible spectrometry

Records recording the basic operation and calibration of a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer

Records recording the operation and optimisation of a flame atomic absorption spectrometer: records for the determination of method validation parameters (sensitivity, detection limits, reproducibility, linearity, interferences etc.)

 

 

5. Write experimental reports and evaluate scientific data including the reliability of analytical data using simple statistical and quality control techniques.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard show the value of making a forensic strategy in terms of assessment and examination: importantly making appropriate structured notes to enable quick recall at a later date are essential

 

Interpret spectra relating to the qualitative forensic analysis of organic molecules by ultraviolet ‑ visible spectroscopy (pure liquids, solution and vapour phase spectra): collection and interpretation

Interpret spectra relating to the interpretation of Infrared spectra of forensic samples, organic functional group analysis and identification of unknown using computerised spectral databases.

 

Regarding Forensic Science Society component standard evaluate and interpret data from equipment applied to a range of forensic examinations. Include the use of statistical tests to aid interpretation.

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
50 %
End of Semester / Year Formal Exam
50 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Class exercises, homework exercises, pre-laboratory assignments Formative Assignment - % OnGoing 1,2
2 Short in class exercises and homework exercises pre laboratory assignments, written assessments, assignments Continuous Assessment Assignment 10 % OnGoing 1,2
3 Surpervised data collection, recording and results calculation in laboratory and feedback Continuous Assessment Performance Evaluation 15 % OnGoing 3,4,5
4 Continuous assessment of laboratory reports, quality of analytical results, laboratory technique, pre laboratory exercises Continuous Assessment Practical Evaluation 25 % OnGoing 3,4,5

End of Semester / Year Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Final Exam Final theory examination Final Exam UNKNOWN 50 % End of Term 1,2
             
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Tiered Classroom Lecture 1 Weekly 1.00
Problem Based Learning Flat Classroom Spectral analysis and calculations 1 Weekly 1.00
Laboratory Practical Science Laboratory Laboratory Practical 2 Weekly 2.00
Independent Learning UNKNOWN Self Study 3 Weekly 3.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 4.00 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Boyd, R. K., Basic, C. and Bethem, R. A. (2008) Trace quantitative chemical analysis by mass spectrometry, Chichester: Wiley.

Broekaert, J. A. C. (2002) Analytical atomic spectrometry with flames and plasmas, Weinheim: Wiley-VCH.

Cole, M. D. (2003) The analysis of controlled substances, New York: Wiley.

Dean, J. R., Ando, D. J. and Metcalfe, E. (1997) Atomic absorption and plasma spectroscopy, Chichester: Published on behalf of ACOL (University of Greenwich) by J. Wiley.

Downard, K. and Royal Society of, C. (2004) Mass spectrometry: a foundation course, Cambridge: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Ebdon, L. and Evans, E. H. (1998) An introduction to analytical atomic spectrometry, Chichester: John Wiley.

Hansen, S., Pedersen-Bjergaard, S. and Rasmussen, K. (2012) Introduction to pharmaceutical chemical analysis, Chichester, West Sussex: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Harris, D. C. (2010) Quantitative chemical analysis, New York: W. H. Freeman and Co.

Haswell, S. J. (1991) Atomic absorption spectrometry: theory, design, and applications, Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Heard, B. J. (2008) Handbook of firearms and ballistics: examining and interpreting forensic evidence, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Hill, S. J. (2007) Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry and its applications, Oxford: Blackwell Pub.

Jickells, S. and Negrusz, A. P. D. (2008) Clarke's analytical forensic toxicology, Chicago: Pharmaceutical Press.

Kurfürst, U. (1998) Solid sample analysis: direct and slurry sampling using GF-AAS and ETV-ICP, New York: Springer.

Metcalfe, E. and Prichard, F. E. (1987) Atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy, Chichester: Published on behalf of ACOL, by J. Wiley.

Pretsch, E., Bühlmann, P. and Badertscher, M. (2009) Structure determination of organic compounds: tables of spectral data, Berlin: Springer.

Skoog, D. A., Holler, F. J. and Crouch, S. R. (2017) Principles of Instrumental Analysis. Cengage Learning

Stuart, B. (2004) Infrared spectroscopy: fundamentals and applications, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Stuart, B. and Ando, D. J. (1996) Modern infrared spectroscopy, New York: Published on behalf of ACOL (University of Greenwich) by Wiley.

United States. Federal Bureau of, I. (2008) FBI handbook of crime scene forensics, New York: Skyhorse Pub.

Whittaker, D. (2000) Interpreting organic spectra, Cambridge, UK: Royal Society of Chemistry.

Journal Resources

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Other Resources

 McGowan, T.,  Analytical Spectroscopy Laboratory Manual and Lecture Notes,  IT Sligo.

Additional Information

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