CARE09002 2016 Social Inclusion and Diversity

General Details

Full Title
Social Inclusion and Diversity
Transcript Title
Social Inclusion and Diversit
Code
CARE09002
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
CARE - Social Studies
Department
SOCS - Social Sciences
Level
09 - NFQ Level 9
Credit
10 - 10 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2016 - Full Academic Year 2016-17
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Susan McDonnell, Jessica Mannion, Karin White, Kate Brown, Tamsin Cavaliero
Programme Membership
SG_WSOCI_M09 201700 Master of Arts in Social Care & Social Justice
Description

The aim of this module is to equip students with the skills of a professional practitioner working within a society marked by diversity/super-diversity. To recognise and critically analyse social exclusion and the means to develop practical interventions to challenge the same.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Explore and recognise one's own prejudices, perceptions and imaginary of 'the other'.

2.

Define, analyse and critically appraise concepts and theoretical perspectives of social inclusion and diversity/super-diversity

3.

Analyse methods for promoting social inclusion and challenging social exclusion

4.

A) Develop, B) implement and C) evaluate creative approaches to social inclusion

5.

Identify and examine social exclusion, its causes and its context relating to professionals' first-hand experiences.

Teaching and Learning Strategies

This module will be delivered in a blended learning format comprise of the following elements:

  1. Introductory face‑to‑face class period
  2. Online lectures x 6 accompanied by discussion requirements on key learning points (18 hours)
  3. In class 2.5 day period of teaching and learning (18 hours)

Independent study by learners

Module Assessment Strategies

The essay is an assessment to facilitate the learner to demonstrate her/his learning and the ability to formulate critical and challenging thought processes.

The method of practical assessment chosen reflects current work and research practices where it is likely that the learner may be required to deliver a practical based project for and with members of the community. Such an assessment strategy enables learners to demonstrate their capacity to develop their own thinking in relation to frameworks for social justice work and engage with the practical challenges of initiating change in their own work setting.

Theoretical Essay 50% (3,500 words)

Practical 50%

Repeat Assessments

Learners will repeat the practical and/or the essay with assignment guidelines provided

Module Dependencies

Prerequisites
Social Locations: An Intersectional Approach

Indicative Syllabus

1: Explore and recognise one's own prejudices, perceptions and imaginary of 'the other'.

Using and analysing ethnographic case studies students will be able to reflect on their own culturally relative attitudes towards ‘the other’.

2: Identify and examine social exclusion, its causes and its context relating to professionals' first-hand experiences.

Students will examine critical perspectives and key theories eg: Intersectional Theory and Interculturalism.

3: Define, analyse and critically appraise concepts and theoretical perspectives of social inclusion and diversity/super-diversity

Students will integrate their theoretical learning from previous semesters through applying discussions of contemporary and historical concepts, such as racism/sectarianism, ableism, super-diversity contested identities, ethnicity, culture, normativity, equality, social inclusion, rights and recognition- multiculturalism, interculturalism, integration, assimilation, inclusion, anti-oppressive practice.

4: Analyse methods for promoting social inclusion and challenging social exclusion

Using examples from Ireland and further afield, students will develop their skills of working towards inclusion (intersectional approach), addressing context and factors contributing to social exclusion, such as poverty, lack of access to services, language acquisition, scape-goating.

5: A) Develop, B) implement and C) evaluate creative approaches to social inclusion

Students will develop practical creative approaches to conceive, establish and co-ordinate creative projects to promote social inclusion, such as Common Third, Theatre of the Oppressed in the frame of emancipatory practice, storytelling.

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Essay Project Essay 50 % Week 13 1,2,5
2 Practical Practical Practical Evaluation 50 % Week 13 3,4
             

Part Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Workshop Flat Classroom Workshop 18 Once Per Module 1.20
Total Part Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 1.20 Hours

Online Learning Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Online Lecture Online Lecture 3 Fortnightly 1.50
Total Online Learning Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 1.50 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Arnaut, K; Chokri, B.C. (2013) Staging/Caging ‘otherness’ in the postcolony: spectres of the human zoo. Critical Arts, 27 (6) 661-683. doi: 10.1080/02560046.2013.867589

Gast, L; Patmore, A, (2012) Approaches to Diversity in Social Work. Jessica Kingsley Publishers, London

Cavarero, A. (2000) Relating Narratives: Storytelling and Selfhood. Routledge, London; New York

Conrad, D; Sinner, A (2015) Creating Together: Participatory, Community-Based and Collaborative Arts Practices and Scholarships Across Canada. Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Canada

Friiz, B. (2014) InExActArt: The Autopoetic Theatre of Augusto Boal. Ibidem Press, Stuttgart

Hanlon, N. (2009) Valuing equality in Irish Social Care. Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies. 9 (1) pp 5-14.

Hills, J; Le Grand,J.; Piachaud, D. (Eds) Understanding Social Exclusion, (2002) Oxford University Press

Kears, P. (2006) Doing is the best way of Saying. Face on. Dublin: Create.

Kelly, F; Finnernan, M. (2016) Drama and Social Justice: Theory, Research and Practice in International Contexts. Routledge, Oxon

Lawn, Ch. (2007) Gadamer: a guide for the perplexed. Continuum IPG, London; New York

Lindemann, S. (2014) Explaining divergent responses to ethnic exclusion: evidence from two paired comparisons. Conflict, Security and Development, 14(2), 181-211. doi: 10.1080/14678802.2014.903693

Maguire, T (2006) Making Theatre in Northern Ireland: Through and Beyond the Troubles. University of Exeter Press, Exeter

Moosa-Mitha, M., (2005) Situating anti-oppressive theories within critical and difference-centered perspectives. In L. Brown & S. Strega (Eds.) Research as Resistance 37–72. Canadian Scholars' Press, Toronto

Thompson, N. (2001) Anti-discriminatory practice. Hampshire: Palgrave.

 Thomposn (2003) Promoting equality: Challenging discrimination and oppression.Hampshire: Paigrave Macmillan.

Vertovec, S. (2012) ‘Diversity’ and the Social Imaginary. European Journal of Sociology, 53 (3), 287-312

Vilhauer, M. (2010) Gadamer’s ethics of play: hermeneutics and the other. Lexington Books, Marylan

Wessendorf, S. (2013) Commonplace diversity and the ‘ethos of mixing’: perceptions of difference in a London neighbourhood. Identities, 20(4), 407-22

Wessendorf, S. (2013) ‘Being open but sometimes closed’. Conviviality in a super-diverse London neighbourhood. European Journal of Cultural Studies. doi: 10.1177/1367549413510415

White, K; Costello, J (eds) (2012) The Imaginary of the Stranger: Encountering the Other. Donegal County Council

White, K; Costello, J, (2013) Port na Failte presents Three Years of Social Action. Donegal County Council

Yee, J. (2005) Critical anti-racism praxis: The concept of whiteness implicated. In S. Hick, J. Fook; R. Pozzuto (Eds.), Social work, a critical turn, 87–104. Thompson, Toronto

Young, I. M. (2000) Five faces of oppression. In Adams, M. (Ed.), Readings for Diversity and Social Justice, 35–49. Routledge, New York