CARE08052 2016 Perspectives on Childcare: Culture, Context and Comparison

General Details

Full Title
Perspectives on Childcare: Culture, Context and Comparison
Transcript Title
Perspectives on Childcare
Code
CARE08052
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
CARE - Social Studies
Department
SOCS - Social Sciences
Level
08 - NFQ Level 8
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2016 - Full Academic Year 2016-17
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Gwen Scarbrough, Karin White, Tamsin Cavaliero
Programme Membership
SG_HEARL_H08 201700 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Humanities in Early Childhood Care and Educ SG_HEARL_H08 201800 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Early Childhood Care and Educ
Description

 

Childcare and growing up is a universal concern. However, there are many different experiences of childhood, and parental goals, values, methods and traditions differ widely and depend on time, space and cultural context. Although Ireland was always home to people with different ethnic/religious/cultural backgrounds, including the Traveller, Jewish and Protestant communities, the twenty-first century has seen a significant increase in diversity among the Irish population. Therefore, it is essential for ECCe professionals to develop an informed understanding of culturally diverse approaches of growing up in order to support the cultural and social well-being of children and Young people they may be working with, while simultaneously supporting adults to adjust to change, new demands and experiences as parents, as well as informing social policy in terms of cultural diversity, anti-racism and empowerment. In order to do so, the student will have to examine their own point of view and perception, challenge their ‘truths’ and maybe reach a new perspective. Through the use of case studies students will look at cultures, place them in context and compare them.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.
  1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of cultural relativity in relation to experiences of childhood and the theories surrounding it.
2.
  1. Apply an understanding of, and reflection on, the impact of ethnocentrism and provide alternative perspectives
3.
  1. Display an empathetic understanding of the impact of cultural differences in a variety of environments
4.
  1. Re-examine attitudes, judgements and values in a practitioner context and apply alternative methods of working in an intercultural environment.
5.
  1. Identify Social Justice approaches to working in formal, non-formal and informal education settings in national and international contexts.

Teaching and Learning Strategies

This module will be delivered through a weekly two hour lecture and one hour tutorial. Within this framework each lecture will analyse and discuss a classic ethnographic study, making direct links to the students’ own experiences wider debates at national and international levels.

Module Assessment Strategies

There will be an exam and a project to assess learners understanding of key tenets of the module and their capacity to interpret their learning in the context of particular work environments.

Essay 50%

Project 50%

Repeat Assessments

Learners will repeat either the exam or the project with assignment guidelines provided

Indicative Syllabus

  •  

    Apply an understanding of, and reflection on, the impact of ethnocentrism and provide alternative perspectives

    Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the experiences of growing up in a range of societal contexts such as matrilineal societies and patrilineal societies. The students will also examine children’s behaviours and carer’s responses within cultural contexts.

    Display an empathetic understanding of the impact of cultural differences in a variety of environments

    Students will explore their own attitudes towards youth cultures, rites of passage, and concepts of parenthood, family and gender in order to recognise and question their own cultural bias.

    Re-examine attitudes, judgements and values in a practitioner context and apply alternative methods of working in an intercultural environment.

    Students will consider cultural determinants of perspectives on sexuality, parental goals, methods and ethics and how to respond to them in a culturally sensitive framework.

    Identify Social Justice approaches to working in formal, non-formal and informal education settings in national and international contexts.

    Students will examine the human rights of the child within the context of cultural relativity. Particular attention will be paid to EU Roma Framework and Travellers and Roma in formal, informal and non-formal education environments

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
50 %
End of Semester / Year Formal Exam
50 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Project Project Project 50 % Week 7 3,4,5
             
             

End of Semester / Year Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Exam Final Exam Open Book Exam 50 % Week 13 1,2
             
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Lecture Theatre Lecture 2 Weekly 2.00
Tutorial Flat Classroom Tutorial 1 Weekly 1.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 3.00 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Aamodt, Christina (2012) The participation of children in Mycenaean cult. Childhood in the past 5:35-50.

Achpal, Beena, Goldman, Jane A., and Rohner, Ronald P. (2007) A comparison of European American and Puerto Rican parents’ goals and expectations about socialization and education of preschool children. International Journal of Early Years’ Education 15:1-13.

Alber, Erdmute (2004) Schooling or working? How family decision processes, children’s agencies and state policy influence the life paths of children in northern Benin. In Gerd Spittler and Michael Bourdillon (Eds.), African Children at Work: Working and Learning in Growing Up.pp. 169-194. Berlin: Lit Verlag.

Anderson-Levitt, Kathryn M. (2002) The school yard gate: Schooling and childhood in global perspective. Journal of Social History 38(4):987-1006.

Aptekar, Lewis (1991) Are Colombian street children neglected? The contributions of ethnographic and ethnohistorical approaches to the study of children. Anthropology and Education Quarterly 22(4):326-349.

Barry, Herbert III. (2007) Customs associated with premarital sexual freedom in 143 societies. Coss-Cultural Research 41:261-272.

Baxter, Paul T.W. and Butt, Audrey (1953) The Azande, and related peoples of the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan and and Belgian Congo. London:International African Institute.

Bird-David, Nurit (2005)Studying children in “hunter gatherer” societies: Reflections from a Nayaka perspective. In Barry S. Hewlett and Michael E. Lamb (Eds.), Hunter Gatherer Childhoods: Evolutionary, Developmental, and Cultural Perspectives. Pp 92-101. New Brunswick, NJ: Aldine/Transaction Publishers.

Bloch, Maurice E.F., Solomon, Gregg E.A. and Carey, Susan (2001) Zafimaniry: An understanding of what is passed on from parents to children: A cross cultural investigation. Journal of Cognition and Culture 1(1):43-68.

Bril, Blandine, Zack, Martine, and Nkounkou-Hombessa, Estelle (1989) Ethotheories of development and education: A view from different cultures. European Journal of Psychology of Education 4:307-318.

Delaney, Cassandra H. (1995) Rites of passage in adolescence. Adolescence 30:891-898.

Evans-Pritchard, Edward E. (1937) Witchcraft, oracles and magic among the Azande. Oxford: Claendon Press.

(1902/1973) The Nuer:a description of the modes of livelihood and political institutions of a Nilotic people. Oxford:Clarendon Press.

Fortes, Meyer (1950) Kinship and marriage among the Ashanti. In A.R. Radcliffe-Brown and Forde, Daryll Forde(Eds) African Kinships and Marriage. Pp. 252-284. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gray, Brenda M. (1994) Enga birth, maturation and survival:Physiological charactaristics of the life cycle in the New Guinea Highlands. In Carol P. MacCormack (Ed), Ethnographyof fertility and Birth. Pp65-103. Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press.

Kenny, M. (1997) The Routes of Resistance: Travellers and Second Level Schooling. Ashgate. Aldershot

LeVine, Robert A. (2004)Challenging expert knowledge: Findings from an African study of infant care and development. In Uwe P. Gielen and Jaipaul L. Roopnarine (Eds.), Childhood and Adolescence: Cross-Cultural Perspectives and Applications. Pp 149-165. Westport, CT: Preager.

Murray, C. (2012) ‘A Minority within a Minority? Social Justice for Traveller and Roma Children in ECEC’ in European Journal of Education, vol. 47, No. 4, 2012

(2014) Attachment theory as cultural ideology. In Hiltrud Otto and Heidi Keller (Eds.), Different Faces of Attachment: Cultural Variations of a Universal Human Need. Pp. 50-65. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Pellissier, Catherine (1991) The anthropology of teaching and learning. Annual Review of Anthroplogy 20:75-95.

Malinowski, Bronislaw (1929) The Sexual Life of Savages: An Ethnographic Account of Courtship, Marriage, and Family Life Among the Natives of the Trobriand Islands, British New Guinea. London Routledge, Kegan, Paul.

Mead, Margaret (1928/1961) Coming of age in Samoa. New York, NY: New American Library.

Tyson, Karolyn (2002) Weighing in: Elementary age students and the debate on attitudes toward school among Black students. Social Forces 80:1157-1189.




Additional Information

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