CARE07039 2016 Sociology 3: An intersectional approach

General Details

Full Title
Sociology 3: An intersectional approach
Transcript Title
Sociology 3
Code
CARE07039
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
CARE - Social Studies
Department
SOCS - Social Sciences
Level
07 - NFQ Level 7
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2016 - Full Academic Year 2016-17
End Term
9999 - The End of Time
Author(s)
Susan McDonnell, Tamsin Cavaliero
Programme Membership
SG_WSOCI_H08 201600 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Social Care Practice SG_HSOCI_H08 201700 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Social Care Practice SG_HSOCI_H08 201900 Bachelor of Arts (Honours) in Social Sciences in Social Care Practice
Description

The aim of this module is to introduce students to key themes in sociology through an intersectional approach. Intersectionality offers a useful lens for the study of overlapping forms of exclusion or disadvantage (such as gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, age, disability/ability, migration status, etc.). The module provides students with both analytical and practical applications for identifying and addressing social exclusion and marginalisation.

This module maps to the CORU Standards of Proficiency below:

Domain 1: Professional Autonomy and Accountability

Domain 4: Professional Development

Domain 5: Professional Knowledge and Skills

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Describe intersectionality as a lens for understanding multidimensional influences of social locations in people’s experiences of privilege and oppression. (Domain 1.8, 1.23,5.2, 5.7, 5.14)

2.

Recognise the significance of social location in professional identity across a range of care and community contexts. (Domain1.5,1.8, 1.23, 4.4, 5.2)

3.

Identify the relevance of identity categories (such as gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, age, disability/ability, migration status, etc.) in social care contexts.  (Domain1.5, 1.8,1.22, 1.23, 5.2, 5.7, 5.14)

4.

Explain how intersectional principles can be applied to practice. (Domain1.5, 1.8, 1.23, 4.4, 5.2, 5.7, 5.14)

5.

Discuss implications of this approach for policy at local national and international levels. (Domain 1.8, 5.2, 5.14)

Teaching and Learning Strategies

3 hours contact per week

Module Assessment Strategies

Reflective Journal to assess students’ understanding of key aspects of the module and their capacity to interpret their learning in the context of classroom discussion. In particular, their awareness of the complexity of issues facing groups, individuals and families.

Individual Reflective Journal 50%

Group Project 50%

This modules assessment allows for assessment of CORU Standards of Proficiency as follows:

Individual Reflective Journal: Domain 1.5, 1.8, 1.22, 1.23, 4.4, 5.2

Group Project: Domain 1.5, 1.23, 5.7, 5.14

Repeat Assessments

Learners will repeat either the individual reflective journal or the group project with assignment guidelines provided

Module Dependencies

Prerequisites
Sociology 2

Indicative Syllabus

Introduction to intersectionality

Critical legal race scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw defined the term intersectionality in 1989, drawing on a history of scholarship among black and Latina activists and feminists. Students will be introduced to theories of intersectionality as developed by writers from a range of disciplines addressing intersections between categories such as feminism, race, migration, ethnicity, colonialism, as they are shaped by power differentials.

Intersectional Interventions

This module will explore how social policy, advocacy and social movements may fail to address the needs of service users, particularly where they are affected by more than one form of exclusion.

Professional Identity

Intersectionality recognises the central role played by power in personal and professional relationships. Students will be invited to consider the importance of reflexive praxis as an aspect of professional identity.

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

End of Semester / Year Formal Exam
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Individual Reflective Journal Continuous Assessment Individual Project 50 % OnGoing 1,2,3
2 Group Project Project Project 50 % Week 13 4,5
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Lecture Theatre Weekly Lecture 1 Weekly 1.00
Tutorial Flat Classroom Tutorial 2 Weekly 2.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 3.00 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

African American Policy Forum (n.d.) Primer on Intersectionality. Columbia Law School. New York

Anthias, F. (2002) Where do I belong? Narrating collective identity and translocational positionality. Ethnicities 2(4) 491-514

Anthias, F. (2006) Belongings in a Globalising and Unequal World: Rethinking Translocations. In N. Yuval-Davis, K. Kannabiran and U.M. Vieten (eds.), The Situated Politics of Belonging. London, Sage Publications

Collins, P.H. (2009) [1990]. Black feminist thought: knowledge, consciousness, and the politics of empowerment. New York: Routledge.

Crenshaw, K.W. (1995) ‘Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color’ in Critical Race Theory: The Key Writings that Formed the Movement (New York: The New Press, 1995), 357-383.

Crenshaw, K.W. (2003). African American Policy Forum (n.d.) Primer on Intersectionality. Columbia Law School. New York

Anthias, F. (2002) Where do I belong? Narrating collective identity and translocational positionality. Ethnicities 2(4) 491-514

Anthias, F. (2006) Belongings in a Globalising and Unequal World: Rethinking Translocations. In N. Yuval-Davis, K. Kannabiran and U.M. Vieten (eds.), The Situated Politics of Belonging. London, Sage Publications

Traffic at the crossroads: multiple oppressions. In ed. R. Morgan, Sisterhood is forever: the women’s anthology for a new millennium (pp. 43-57). New York: Washington Square Press.

Dhamoon, R. (2011). Considerations on Mainstreaming Intersectionality. Political Research Quarterly. 64, 230-243.

European Commission (2014) Report of the implementation of the EU framework for National Roma Integration Strategies.http://ec.europa.eu/justice/discrimination/files/roma_implement_strategies2014_en.pdf

Haines-Saah, R. et. al. (2016) ‘Understanding Adolescent Narratives about Bullying Through an Intersectional Lens’ in Youth and Society.

Hankivsky, O. (2014) Intersectionality 101. The Institute for Intersectionality Research and Policy, SFU.

Lister, R. (2004) Poverty. Key Concepts. Polity Press

McIntosh, P. (1999) ‘White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack’ in A. Kesselman et al. (eds.), Women: Images and Realities (Mountain View, CA, 1999) 358-361.

Miles, R. and Brown, M. (1989) Racism. Key Ideas: The Open University. Routledge.

Murray, C. (2012) ‘A Minority within a Minority? Social Justice for Traveller and Roma Children in ECEC’ in European Journal of Education, vol. 47, no. 4

Oprea, A. (2004) Re-envisioning Social Justice from the Ground Up: Including the Experiences of Romani Women. Essex Human Rights Review. Vol1. No. 1

Russo, A. (1991) ‘“We Cannot Live Without Our Lives”: White Women, Antiracism, and Feminism’ in C. Mohanty et al. (eds.), Third World Women and the Politics of Feminism (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1991), 297-313 at 306.

Stienstra, D. (2012) ‘Race/ ethnicity and disability studies: Towards an explicitly approach. IN: Watson, N., Roulstone, A and Thomas, C. Handbook of disability studies. Oxon: Routledge.

Teverson, A. and Upstone, S. (2011) Postcolonial Spaces: The Politics of Place in Contemporary Culture. Palgrave Macmillan

Valentine, G. (2007) Theorizing and Researching Intersectionality: A Challenge for Feminist Geography in The Professional Geographer Vol. 59, no. 1

Woodward, K. and Woodward, S. (2009) Why Feminism Matters: Lost and Found, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.

Yuval-Davis, N. (20110 The Politics of Belonging: Intersectional Contestations. London, Sage.Yuval-Davis, N. (1999) Institutional Racism, Cultural Diversity and Citizenship: Some Reflections on Reading the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry Report. Sociological Research Online 4(1) www.socresonline.org.uk/socresonline/4/lawrence/yuval-davis.html Accessed May 14th 2011

 

 

 

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