ARCH08019 2013 EXPERIMENTAL AND EXPERIENTIAL ARCHAEOLOGY

General Details

Full Title
EXPERIMENTAL AND EXPERIENTIAL ARCHAEOLOGY
Transcript Title
EXPERIMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGY
Code
ARCH08019
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
ARCH - Archaeology
Department
ESCI - Environmental Science
Level
08 - NFQ Level 8
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2013 - Full Academic Year 2013-14
End Term
2019 - Full Academic Year 2019-20
Author(s)
Billy Fitzgerald, Fiona Beglane
Programme Membership
SG_SAPPL_K08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology Add On SG_SAPPL_K08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology Add On SG_SAPPL_H08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology
Description

The aim of this module is to provide students with an appreciation of the skills and abilities of past peoples in developing and using technologies, and the role of technology in society.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.

Demonstrate knowledge, critical understanding and theoretical grounding in the scientific use of experiments within archaeological research.

2.

Evaluate the utility and characteristics of a range of materials potentially including ceramics, stone, metals and organic materials.

3.

Demonstrate an ability to design, carry out and report on an archaeological experiment focused on a particular aspect of the technologies and processes of the past, from the acquisition of raw materials to manufacture, use and discard; and to post-depositional processes.

4.

Effectively communicate the role of experiments and “reconstructions” in a variety of forms, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, including education and public outreach.

5.

Apply the results of experimental and experiential archaeology to the interpretation of the findings of archaeological survey and excavation.

Module Assessment Strategies

This module is assessed using a combination of examination and practical assessment.  The exam will demonstrate understanding of the concepts and procedures in experimental archaeology.  The practical assessment will demonstrate that learning outcomes based around the ability to design, conduct and communicate experimental archaeology are met.  

Indicative Syllabus

History of experimental archaeology

Theoretical aspects of experimental archaeology: processual and post-processual approaches, ethnoarchaeology

Applications: Artefacts in stone, clay, metals, bone, wood, animal skins and hides

Pyrotechnology: cooking, brewing and preserving; smelting, metalworking, ceramic production

Reconstruction, re-enactment and dissemination for public education

Health & Safety

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
70 %
End of Semester / Year Formal Exam
30 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Continuous Assessment Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 70 % OnGoing 2,3,4,5
             
             

End of Semester / Year Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Final Exam Written exam Final Exam UNKNOWN 30 % End of Term 1,2,5
             
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Lecture Flat Classroom Lecture 1 Weekly 1.00
Practical Science Laboratory Experimental and experiental learning - archaeology lab 2 Weekly 2.00
Independent Learning UNKNOWN Self study 4 Weekly 4.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 3.00 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Books

Coles, J. (1973) Archaeology by Experiment London: Hutchinson

Hodges, H. (1995) Artifacts: An Introduction to Early Materials and Technology. London: Duckworth

Reynolds, P. (2003) Experiment in Archaeology. Stroud: NPI

Journals

EUROREA (European Reconstruction and Experiment in Archaeology)

Other Resources
None
Additional Information

Timetable theory and practical as a 3 hour block in the archaeology lab (theory and practical) to maximise interactive mode of delivery of theory and practical, to allow access to replica and reference materials  and to allow variation in the proportion of each to meet the overall whole.