ARCH08016 2013 INTERPRETING THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANIMALS

General Details

Full Title
INTERPRETING THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANIMALS
Transcript Title
INTERPRETING ARCH OF ANIMALS
Code
ARCH08016
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
ARCH - Archaeology
Department
ESCI - Environmental Science
Level
08 - NFQ Level 8
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2013 - Full Academic Year 2013-14
End Term
2019 - Full Academic Year 2019-20
Author(s)
Billy Fitzgerald, Fiona Beglane
Programme Membership
SG_SAPPL_H08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology SG_SAPPL_K08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology Add On SG_SAPPL_H08 201700 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology
Description

This module builds on the skills and knowledge developed in the module 'Zooarchaeology'.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.
Explain the detailed principles on which Zooarchaeology is based.
2.

Demonstrate competence in analysing, evaluating and drawing conclusions from data derived from animal bone assemblages.

3.

Explain the principal economic uses of animals and the evidence associated with these.

4.

Explain the principal non-economic situations for human-animal interaction.

5.

Organise and integrate theoretical and practical concepts presented into a detailed view of zooarchaeological concepts.

6.

Effectively communicate scientific principles to a peer audience.

7.

Critically analyse case studies of the application of zooarchaeological techniques in interpreting archaeological sites and landscapes.

8.
Integrate data from a variety of case studies to provide overviews of aspects of past societies.

Module Assessment Strategies

The assessment methods are designed to promote understanding, interpretation and communication of the learning outcomes by use of continuous assessment methods. 

Module Dependencies

Co-requisites
None
Incompatibles
None

Indicative Syllabus

Domestication: the transition to the Neolithic

Secondary products in past economies

Food taboos and customs

Food as an indicator of status and identity

Animals in religion, myth and legend

The role of animals in marginal economies

Hunting in agricultural societies

Animals in art, architecture and literature

Animals as indicators of status and identity

Pets in human societies

Advanced analysis of animal bone assemblages

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Performance Evaluation Seminar submissions Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 40 % OnGoing 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
2 Assignment - Project reports, posters, essays Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 60 % OnGoing 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8
             

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Directed Learning Science Laboratory Lectures and seminars - Archaeology lab 1.5 Weekly 1.50
Practical Science Laboratory Project - Archaeology lab 1.5 Weekly 1.50
Independent Learning UNKNOWN Self study 4 Weekly 4.00
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 3.00 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Essential Reading:

Davis, S. (2012) The archaeology of animals.  London, Routledge

Klein, R.G. and Cruz-Uribe, K. (1984) The Analysis of Animal Bones from Archeological Sites.  Chicago, University of Chicago Press

O'Connor, T. P. (2008) The archaeology of animal bones.  Stroud, Sutton

Reitz, E.J. and Wing E. (2004) Zooarchaeology.  Cambridge University Press

This module is primarily based around a series of lectures and readings from the literature, however the books shown give an overview of the principles being discussed.   A more detailed listing will be provided in the class. 

Other Resources

None

Additional Information

Timetable as a 3 hour block in the archaeology lab (theory and practical) to maximise interactive mode of delivery of theory and practical and allow access to reference and replica material.