ARCH07030 2013 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY

General Details

Full Title
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY
Transcript Title
ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY
Code
ARCH07030
Attendance
N/A %
Subject Area
ARCH - Archaeology
Department
ESCI - Environmental Science
Level
07 - NFQ Level 7
Credit
05 - 05 Credits
Duration
Semester
Fee
Start Term
2013 - Full Academic Year 2013-14
End Term
2019 - Full Academic Year 2019-20
Author(s)
Chris Read
Programme Membership
SG_SAPPL_H08 201300 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology SG_SAPPL_B07 201700 Bachelor of Science in Applied Archaeology SG_SAPPL_H08 201700 Bachelor of Science (Honours) in Applied Archaeology
Description

All archaeology is interpretive. Whether an archaeologist is aware of it or not, archaeological theory governs all archaeological interpretations. Theory affects every aspect of archaeology from how a site is excavated to how artefact assemblages are organized; from how excavations are interpreted to the identification of regional patterns and aspects of human nature and evolution. The best archaeologists are those who are not only aware of archaeological theory but of both its necessity and the limitations of any one theoretical paradigm.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module the learner will/should be able to;

1.
Identify and differentiate the main theoretical paradigms used in archaeology.
2.
Explain the relationship between archaeological theory, method and interpretation.
3.
Review and attempt critiques of archaeological texts.
4.
Express these critiques of archaeological texts through oral and written mediums.
5.

Discuss the dichotomy between ‘objective' scientific analysis and ‘subjective' interpretation.

6.
Identify those questions which lie outside areas of ethical archaeological enquiry.

Module Assessment Strategies

The assessments are based primarily on guided reading and the group discussion in seminar format of the key issues explored in the readings. The student will have to give a short presentation of two papers over the course of the module and lead the discussion. The final essay will focus on critical reading and writing, essential skills in professional archaeology.

Module Dependencies

Prerequisites
None
Co-requisites
None
Incompatibles
None

Indicative Syllabus

  1. Culture History, Processual and Post Processual
  2. The interpretation of Palaeolithic cave art
  3. The archaeology of gender
  4. Archaeology and history
  5. The role of material culture
  6. Ethno-archaeology
  7. Archaeology and politics/nationalism
  8. Critical and relativist archaeology
  9. Landscape Archaeology
  10. Cultural complexity/power relations
  11. Pseudoarchaeology
  12. Cognitive Archaeology
  13. Agency
  14. Review

Coursework & Assessment Breakdown

Coursework & Continuous Assessment
100 %

Coursework Assessment

Title Type Form Percent Week Learning Outcomes Assessed
1 Presentations Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 30 % OnGoing 1,2,3,4,5,6
2 Participation in discussion Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 30 % OnGoing 3,4,5,6
3 Essay Essay 2000 words Continuous Assessment UNKNOWN 40 % End of Term 1,2,3,4,5,6

Full Time Mode Workload


Type Location Description Hours Frequency Avg Workload
Problem Based Learning Flat Classroom Problem Based Learning 2.5 Weekly 2.50
Independent Learning UNKNOWN Self Study 4.5 Weekly 4.50
Total Full Time Average Weekly Learner Contact Time 2.50 Hours

Module Resources

Non ISBN Literary Resources

Contemporary Archaeology in Theory: A Reader edited by Robert W. Preucel and Ian Hodder

B.G. Trigger's A History of Archaeological Thought

Matthew Johnson's Archaeological Theory: an introduction

Other Resources

None

Additional Information

None